The TV Effect

New York Knicks Forward Carmelo Anthony argues with Joey Crawford while he was still playing in Denver. (via Sports Illustrated)

New York Knicks Forward Carmelo Anthony argues with Joey Crawford while he was still playing in Denver. (via Sports Illustrated)

Many young athletes watch some of their favorite players on television.  When I was just starting my playing career in basketball, I would watch Manu Ginobili almost every night during the Spurs’ games that actually got televised.  It took a few times of my coach yelling at me for me to understand that I wasn’t a guard and probably shouldn’t try Manu’s moves.

However, this problem is worse with the new generation of beginning basketball players.  When you look at the egos in the NBA today like LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and Carmelo Anthony, they don’t leave good impressions.  These are the three NBA players who argue the most with officials, and for the most part these three players get away with it. (Click herefor a study of the effects of televised sports on youth)

Many skilled youth who watch these games see that these skilled players are arguing and pleading with officials, and try to do the same thing and are surprised when the official slaps them with a technical foul that they very well deserve.

While watching television can do a lot of positives for an athlete, it can also give them an ego so big that no scouts would be likely to look at them because of their attitude.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s