Why the Overhyping of Players Needs to Stop

Manziel poses with the Heisman Memorial Trophy after winning the award for the nation's top College Football player as a Freshman out of Texas A&M (New York Times).

Manziel poses with the Heisman Memorial Trophy after winning the award for the nation’s top College Football player as a Freshman out of Texas A&M (New York Times).

 We all remember a young basketball player out of Toronto named Andrew Wiggins right?  Well, he was ranked as the top recruit in the country by ESPN, whenever he wasn’t even in the United States.  Many “experts” were expecting the Freshman to possibly win Big 12 Player of the Year or even lead the Kansas Jayhawks to a National Championship.  Then something happened, Wiggins did not play as expected against Louisiana-Monroe, only putting up 16 points.

“Well that’s only one game,” you say?  Against UTEP, who has not been in the NCAA Tournament since 2010, Wiggins only had 6 points, 9 on the road at Oklahoma and a grand total of 3 points at home against Oklahoma State, who was picked in a tie atop the Big 12 pre-season by the media. (Click here for Wiggins’ 2013-14 stats)

There are other examples in other sports as well.  For instance, Johhny Manziel could not meet media expectations after winning the Heisman Trophy as a Freshman, even though he suffered an injury during his Sophomore season.  However, with Texas A&M’s win total declining from 11 to 9, many critics blamed Manziel because his numbers were not “high enough.”

My point is this, we overhype too many athletes.  Society and the media both start to talk about how great players are at a certain level of play, without having seen them take the field yet.  Or, after winning an award or two, we expect even better out of them.  Sometimes that just is not possible.  Unfortunately, this is a trend that may continue, hurting athletes’ draft stock because of the “he’s not that good” attitude from one bad game.

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